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  Stock Photos Home »  Cuba Photos » Street Baseball    (8 Stock Photos) 

Street Baseball in Cuba

Baseball was introduced to Cuba in the 1860s by Cubans who studied in the United States and American sailors who ported in the country. The sport quickly spread across the island nation. In 1869, the first Cuban War of Independence spurred Spanish authorities to ban playing the sport in Cuba. The reasons were because Cubans began to prefer baseball to viewing bullfights, which Cubans were expected dutifully attend as homage to their Spanish rulers in an informal cultural mandate. As such, baseball became symbolic of freedom and egalitarianism to the Cuban people. Today, young boys are commonly seen playing baseball or stickball in the streets, often using plastic bottle caps when baseballs aren't available or practical.

 
A Cuban boy plays pitcher in a game of stickball
Boy playing stickball in Cuba
Swing Batter
  A Cuban boy plays pitcher in a game of stickball  
  Boy playing stickball in Cuba  
  Swing Batter  
Street baseball in Cuba
A boy pitches in a game of baseball
Reach
  Street baseball in Cuba  
  A boy pitches in a game of baseball  
  Reach  
A batter swings in a game of baseball
Stickball
  A batter swings in a game of baseball  
  Stickball  



Keywords

Street Baseball American Stickball Pitcher Batter Bat Ball Glove Play Sports Athletics Cuban Boys Stock Photos Fine Art Prints Wallpaper Wall Paper Image Licensing Stock Photography Photographs Travel Photos Fotos Pictures Pics Pix Images


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