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Giraffe feeding

Male red-headed rock agama (Agama agama)

Female red-headed rock agama (Agama agama)

Lion on a mound

Fischer's Lovebirds

Fossils of extinct animals at the The Olduvai Gorge visitor cent

Keywords: Stock Photo Picture Africa African Safari Animals Archeology Dark Continent EAC East Africa East African Community Eastern Africa Endless Plain Evolution Extinct Animals Fauna Fossils Horizontal Nature Oldupai Gorge Outdoors Safari Serengeti National Park Style Sub-Saharan Africa Tanzania Tanzanian Safari The Cradle of Mankind The Olduvai Gorge United Republic of Tanzania Wildlife

Caption:

Fossils of extinct animals at the The Olduvai Gorge visitor cent

Keywords:
Africa African Safari Animals Archeology Dark Continent EAC East Africa East African Community Eastern Africa Endless Plain Evolution Extinct Animals Fauna Fossils Horizontal Nature Oldupai Gorge Outdoors Safari Serengeti National Park Style Sub-Saharan Africa Tanzania Tanzanian Safari The Cradle of Mankind The Olduvai Gorge United Republic of Tanzania Wildlife Images Pictures Pics Photographs Fotos Stock Photos
Notes:
Serengeti National Park, Tanzania - The Olduvai Gorge or Oldupai Gorge is commonly referred to as "The Cradle of Mankind." It is a steep-sided ravine in the Great Rift Valley, which stretches along eastern Africa. Olduvai is in the eastern Serengeti Plains in northern Tanzania and is about 30 miles long. The gorge is named after the Maasai word for the wild sisal plant Sansevieria ehrenbergii, commonly called Oldupaai. It is one of the most important prehistoric sites in the world and has been instrumental in furthering understanding of early human evolution. Excavation work there was pioneered by Louis and Mary Leakey in the 1950s and continued into the twenty first century by Professor Fidelis Masao of the Open University of Tanzania supported by Earthwatch. The first artifacts in Olduvai (pebble tools and choppers) date to circa 2 million years ago but fossil remains of human ancestors have been found from as long as 2.5 million years ago. The earliest archaeological deposit, known as Bed I, has produced evidence of campsites and living floors along with stone tools made of flakes from local basalt and quartz. Since this is the site where these kinds of tools were first discovered, these tools are called Oldowan. It is now thought that the Oldowan toolmaking tradition started about 2.6 million years ago. Bones from this layer are not of modern humans but primitive hominid forms of Paranthropus boisei and the first discovered specimens of Homo habilis.
City/Location:
Serengeti National Park
State/Province/
Subregion:
N/A
Country:
Tanzania
Camera:
Aperture:
8.0
Shutter Speed:
1/25s
ISO Setting:
1000
Focal Length:
16.0mm
Image ID:
Tanzania_3118-Fossils
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Cheetah